Types of Basic Garden Tools


 

Anvil Pruner/Loppers/Shears

 

Anvil Pruners are pruners that cut by pushing a blade through a material. At the end of a cut, the blade meets the base of the pruner, known as the anvil. Anvils are good for dead-heading flowers or getting rid of dead wood, as they tend to crush rather than cut. Anvil pruners are small and hand held, anvil loppers are large tools and tend to be used for shrubs or trees up to two inches in diameters, and anvil shears are medium sized, two handed pruners for more delicate jobs that require strength, such as shaping a hedge. 

 

Bypass Pruner/Loppers/Shears 

 

Bypass pruner are pruners that cut by pushing the blade through a material that rests on a counter-base, also known as the counter-blade. Bypass pruners tend to offer a cleaner cut and don’t crush the plant material as much as Anvil pruners tend to do. Bypass pruners are small and hand held, bypass loppers are large tools and tend to be used for shrubs or trees up to two inches in diameters, and bypass shears are medium sized, two handed pruners for more delicate jobs that require strength, such as shaping a hedge. 

 

 

Hand Cultivator

Part hoe, part rake, A hand cultivator is used to rake and turn the soil, remove weeds, and can also be used as a small plow to turn rows. They are ideal for quick jobs. 

 

Hand Weeder

Hand weeders are the best tool for digging around weeds when you’re on your hands and knees in the garden. It allows you to poke up and loosen the soil in order to pull the weeds out easier. It also acts as excellent leverage when dealing with particularly deep-rooted weeds. 

 

 

Hand Rake

The hand rake is a a metal or plastic tined tool with a handle. The hand rake is great for smaller patches of earth or pots where using a larger rake would be ill-advised. It can be used to collect leaves and fallen debris, loosen soil, and for some very basic weeding.

 

 

Hand Trowel 

A hand trowel is a tool with a pointed, scoop-shaped metal blade and a handle. It is used for digging, transplanting, smoothing, and weeding.

Hand Transplanter 

Hand transplanters are similar to hand trowels in terms of appearance and build, but they tend to be longer and sharper in order to be more precise when moving plants from one location to another. Many transplanters have measurements engraved on the edge of the scoop part of the tool in order to better gauge transplanting and planting depths. 

 

 

Soil Scoop 

A soil scoop is similar to a hand trowel, however, it’s edges are rounded and the scoop deeper in order to lift and carry more soil. Soil scoops are perfect for potting up indoor and outdoor plants, as well as amending your garden soil. 

 

 

Gardener’s Knife

An essential tool, garden knives are exactly what they sound like – knives for the garden. The can be used for cutting twine, opening bags, light pruning, and harvesting. 

 

 

Garden Rake

A rake is essentially an outdoor broom, but instead of a broom head the head consists of long, thin tines. It is used to collect leaves, cut grass, and other debris, as well as for for loosening the soil, levelling, and minor weeding. 

 

Garden Spade

A garden spade is a tool with a sharp flat edge, usually rectangular though they can be pointed, with a long handle. They tend to be narrower and less curved than a traditional shovel. Spades are used for digging – their sharp, flat edges are better to cleave the soil. When moving soil, they tend to be faster than shovels as they can both break and move the soil with ease.

 

Garden Round Shovel 

A garden shovel is a tool with a sharp, curved edge that is more concave than a garden spade, with a long handle. They can be used for digging, lifting, and moving bulk materials. 

 

          

 

Hoe

A hoe is a long-handled tool with a small  rectangular flat surface at an approximate 90 degree angle to the handle, and it is used to shape the soil, weed, clear soil, break up clumps of soil, and harvest root vegetable crops. Hoes can also be made to be hand-sized. 

 

 

Tiller

 

Also known as a cultivator, tillers can be composed of four downwards–faced spikes, or any number of spiked wheels. Like the hand cultivator, it is used to aerate, rake, remove weeds, till or create furrows, and break up soil clods.